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Friday, November 17, 2017

Five Videos About Afro Costa Ricans (information, videos, comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Afro Costa Ricans and showcases five YouTube videos about Afro Costa Ricans in Puerto Limón, Costa Rica.

Selected comments from one of these videos' discussion threads are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in these videos and all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT AFRO-COSTA RICANS
From http://minorityrights.org/minorities/afro-costa-ricans/
"The Spanish began to ship Africans to Costa Rica in the 1500s to substitute for indigenous labour. Most of this initial group eventually became part of the mestizo population.

A second wave began arriving in the 18th century from the Caribbean as free seasonal tortoiseshell fishermen. Subsequently they brought their families to the the Caribbean Talamanca Coast and created self-sufficient farming/fishing and /trading communities that included their own schools. They maintained relations with Jamaica and had little or no contact with the Pacific coast.

The main influx of Afro-Costa Ricans arrived, in the 1890s, as migrant workers from the Caribbean. They were initially involved in the construction of the railroad from the Central Plateau to the Caribbean coast port of Limon. They stayed on to work on the banana plantations and enclaves of the United Fruit Company (UFC now Dole). In the early 20th century few Afro-Costa Ricans travelled to the capital and they retained their English Creole language and culture.

In the 1970s crop disease brought an end to Atlantic Coast cacao cultivation. Fledgling Afro-Costa Rican agricultural prosperity declined along with the end of the country's cacao industry.

Many Afro-Costa Ricans migrated abroad or to the cities and gradually adapted to Costa Rican society. Some remained in the Limon area mostly finding work at the port but this opportunity shrunk significantly with the advent of containerized systems and port privatization.

Currently most of the Afro-Costa Rican population lives in small communities within the Caribbean Coast Province of Limon. In the City of Limón, where a third of the population is Afro-Costa Rican, the community has remained separate in barrios which are 90 per cent black. In the rest of the country, considerable ethnic mixing has taken place. In Limón, Creole English remains the dominant language, although the new generation is bilingual since they receive Spanish-language education.

Despite political participation (since 1949), the economic position of Afro-Costa Ricans has changed little. A small minority have achieved financial success (mostly as professionals) and increasingly become involved in national politics notably Epsy Barr-Campbell former head of the Afro-Costa Rican women's NGO, and president of the Citizen Action Party (PAC).

Afro Costa Rican areas traditionally receive much less investment than the rest of the country. Limon is ranked as the second most disadvantaged province in the country."...

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Additional information and comments about Afro Costa Ricans are included in some of these featured videos, in a quote that is given after Video # 4, and in selected comments from the discussion thread for Video #5.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
Example #1: Afro Costa Ricans


unique5589, Published on Sep 16, 2010

This video is about the African presence in Costa Rica. It includes a brief history of Afro Costa Ricans and famous Afro Costa Ricans. It is in English and Spanish.

The term Afro Costa Rican is referring to someone of African living in and/or from Costa Rica and/or having roots in Costa Rica. Of course, African descendants have other roots and lineages too.
All comments that I find offensive, racist, stereotypical and negative will not be approved. Please be respectful.

It should be noted that many persons of African descent in "Latin" America and the Caribbean do not refer to themselves as, "Afro + nationality" but either as "negros", "afrodescendiente" or by their nationality.

Please visit http://www.afrolatinos.tv/ to see more images of Afro Costa Ricans.

Thanks Unique5589

***
Example #2: DÍA DEL NEGRO PUERTO LIMÓN 31-8-2011.mp4 [Africans Day (in) Puerto Limón]



Carvajaleventoslimon, Published on Sep 9, 2011

Lindo desfile del día del negro se llevó a cabo en las calles céntricas de la ciudad de Limón, buena organización, muy colorido, mucha participación y bien ordenado, felicidades a los organizadores.
-snip-
Google translate from Spanish to English:

Cute parade of the day of the black took place in the downtown streets of the city of Limón, good organization, very colorful, lots of participation and well ordered, congratulations to the organizers.

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Example #3: CARNAVALES LIMON FERRETERIA KIN BAILE 3



Ferreteriakin, Published on Oct 26, 2012

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Example #4: LOS PAYASOS [The Clowns]



Carvajaleventoslimon, Published on Oct 17, 2013

Los tradicionales PAYASOS, SIGLO 21.Octubre 17, 2013. Puerto Limón Costa Rica.
-snip-
Here's an excerpt about the payasos carnival tradition in Puerto Limón Costa Rica:
From https://bishopstravels.wordpress.com/tag/black-history-in-puerto-limon/ Its Carnaval Time in Costa Rica!!!!

Posted on October 18, 2013 by Bishop The Eastside Nappyhead
..."The Puerto Limon Carnaval was so different. Puerto Limon is a small city on the Caribbean side of Costa Rica and home to an Afro-Caribbean Costa Rican population. Many of the black people there speak english as a result of immigration from the Caribbean Islands in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Immigrants went to Costa Rica to work on the banana plantations, turtle fishing and constructing railroads. Many stayed in Costa Rica and bought a long with them a Caribbean way of life in regards to music, dance, food, language and celebrations. The Carnaval lasts all week, starting with with what they call “los payasos” -clowns it seems like local youth run around in strange costumes after a loud song goes off…hitting people and running again. The atmosphere is very exciting and extremely colorful in the backdrop of this Caribbean Central American city."

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Example #5: LIMON, COSTA RICA: BLACK PEOPLE IN CENTRAL AMERICA



Damien M., Published on Jun 1, 2013
-snip-
Here are selected comments from this video's discussion thread. These comments are numbered for referencing purposes only:
1. XaishaMonae, 2014
..."Quick question, do the people in Limon mostly speak spanish or patois?"

**
Reply
2. Damien M., 2013
"+XaishaMonae Its about 60/40 patois/spanish depending on who they're talking to. If they're amongst themselves u may hear alot of patois.. but in commercial places of business it will be spanish. They Take pride in being African descendants so they don't talk spanish all the time.."

**
3. Derwin King, 2015
"Hello sir, I am currently living in Heredia and studying at La Universidad Nacional. I agree that Limon is isolated. It is referred to in a way that makes it seem like a separate entity. People have cautioned me about the safety there as well. I believe that the issue with racism in this country is that people pretend it doesn't exist altogether, so the issues that do exist (however small they are in comparison to the US) are not addressed or solved. People consider the hiked up foreign prices to be a form of racism (which is an ill-informed and incorrect opinion) but I think that's a result of Costa Ricans feeling an intense Big Brother-like omnipresence from the United States. Afro Costa Ricans are still subjected to forms of racism whether implicit or explicit. Thankfully, they are not experiencing it on the murderous level that African Americans do in the US. It's still an issue though."

**
Reply
4. tanya mullings, 2017
"There is propaganda against limon, but its a very safe place and a very important turistic point"
-snip-
In another comment, tanya mullings wrote that is “n another comment, this

**
5. yorsha100, 2017
"Let us clarify a little the history of the arrival of the black people to Costa Rica.There are two moments in history which are different periods. In the first moment they arrived like African slaves brought by the Spaniards during the period of conquest and period of the colony also came brown people product of the mixture of the Spanish with the African slave these arrived like free. This is around the year 1561. The majority of these slaves were established in the province of Guanacaste working on the cattle ranches. Others were established in Cartago. By 1650 the Puebla de los Pardos was created in order to reduce the territory to mulattos, free blacks and browns because of discrimination. Historians report that these groups continued to generate mix and came a time where the black person was no longer evident because of such a mix. I am opening a parenthesis here according to a genetic study that was carried out on the genetic composition of the Costa Rican individual of the Central Valley that is considered white people but in reality in their great majority they are product of the mixture, these have 4.6% of African lineage. The second moment occurs with the construction of the railroad to the Atlantic in the late nineteenth century, arriving the first Jamaican black people around the year 1870 to our Caribbean coast they arrived as free since slavery had been abolished in Jamaica around the year 1834. Black people arrived most of them from Jamaica, from other islands such as Trinidad, Haiti, Saint Lucia and the Bahamas. Although there was a first moment with the African slaves, the black people of the second moment consolidate the Afro-descendant presence in Our country establishing its culture and the characteristics that define it."

**
6. BrooklynSpanishTchr, 2017
"This is great. Thank you. I lived in Costa Rica for four years and now teach Spanish (middle school). My students have so much trouble understanding that racism exists elsewhere and that there are Black populations outside of the US. I plan on using your video to start dialogs in my class!"

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Possible Mauritian Creole to English Translation For The Mauritius Sega Song "Ti Marmit"

Edited by Azizi Powell

(Revised November 16, 2017 12:25 AM ET)

This pancocojams post showcase the original 2002 video of the Mauritian Sega song "Ti Marmit" (also given as "Ti Marmite"). That video shows children playing a circle game while singing that song.

The Mauritian Creole lyrics to "Ti Marmit" are included in this post along with an "English language" translation from that same website.

Three "English translations" of this song are included in this post: an English translation of this song from a Mauritius online forum; a translation from the results of Google Translates "Haitian Creole to English" feature; and a translation that includes additional Haitian Creole, French words, as well as some translations of Mauritius Creole to English that are found in that first cited translation, and/or that are found elsewhere online. That translation also includes my guesses regarding the English words or phrases based on my familiarity with the English language, and particularly with African American Vernacular English.

I believe that the third "English translation" of "Ti Marmit" that is found in this post is probably the most accurate of these three translations. My notes below demonstrate the process by which I've arrived at that conclusion. However, I am NOT saying that this translation is totally correct. Corrections to this translation are very welcome.

The Addendum to this post provides information about Sega music, information about the Mauritian non-profit organization Abaim and their musical group "Group Abaim, and my description of the performance activity of the version of this singing game that is documented in this video.

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The content of this post is presented for cultural, linguistic, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in this video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
Thanks to the non-profit organization Abaim for their work with Mauritian children and youth.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: ABAIM : Ti marmit (original 2002)



Thefriendsbe, Published on Jan 1, 2011

ABAIM : Klip Ti marmit (original 2002)

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LYRICS FOR THIS SONG IN MAURITIAN CREOLE

"Ti Marmit"
(composed by Group Abaim)

Ki nou pou zoué la ?

Ti éna ene ti marmit
Enn ti poule noir ti danse ladan
Li apiye ar ros cari
Alala Aurélie ki ti fer sa
Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie conne pik séga
Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie conne pik séga
1 2 3 roulé matante
4 5 6 mathématique
7 8 9 dan mo panier 9 9 9

Met la main la haut
Met la main dan lerein
Met la main la haut
Met la main dan lerein
Américain cass so lerein
Américain cass so lerein

Ti éna ene ti marmit
Enn ti poule noir ti danse ladan
Li apiye ar ros cari
Alala Manuella….Chloé….Christina….

Source: https://www.radiomoris.com/forum/paroles-classees/3323-paroles-de-ti-marmit-de-grup-abaim.html 24/01/2006, Nathalia
Localisation: Studio 2, Radiomoris
Paroles de "Ti marmit" de Grup Abaim
-snip-
The sound file in this page features a different group singing "To Marmit" than Group Abaim.

From Google search (website no longer available)
"Radio Moris is live broadcasting from Mauritius. RadioMoris broadcast various kind of latest Ragga, sega, hip hop, classic, dance, electronic etc. music.".
****
TRANSLATING "TI MARMIT" FROM MAURITIAN CREOLE TO STANDARD ENGLISH
Pancocojams Editor's Notes About This Song's English translation:
I don't know any language but English. However, since there doesn't appear to be any Mauritian Creole translations for "Ti Marmit" online as of the publication date for this pancocojams posts, it seems to me that both Haitian Creole and French can be used to "suss" out probable meanings for this song's lyrics.

Translation #1:
Here's an English translation for this song from that same radiomoris.com forum which published the Mauritian Creole lyrics that are given above [Note: Given the description of radiomoris.com as an online site from Mauritius, this translation is from Mauritian Creole to English.


Ti Marmit

Ki can we screw up?

Ti éna ene ti marmit
Enn ti hen black ti dance ladan
Li apiye ar ros cari
Alala Aurélie ki ti fer
Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie conne pik sega
Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie conne pik sega
1 2 3 matted roll
4 5 6 mathematical
7 8 9 dan mo cart 9 9 9

Put your hand up
Put your hand in the len
Put your hand up
Put your hand in the len
American cass so lerein
American cass so lerein

Ti éna ene ti marmit
Enn ti hen black ti dance ladan
Li apiye ar ros cari
Alala Manuella ... .Chloe ... .Christina ...."

****
Translation #2
Here's the Google Translates results for the Mauritian Creole to English lyrics:

Ti Marmit

What are we going to do for you?

There is only one small march
The end of the little noisy dunes
She leans to the floor
Alala Aurelie did so
Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie connecting pigeons
Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie connecting pigeons
1 2 3 roulé matante
4 5 6 mathématique
7 8 9 dan mo panier 9 9 9

Join the main la haut
Stay away from home
Join the main la haut
Stay away from home
Américain cass so dress
Américain cass so dress

There is only one small march
The end of the little noisy dunes
She leans to the floor
Alala Manuella ... .Chloé ... .Christina ...."

****
Translation #3
Here's my suggestions the English translations for "Ti Marmit" that are made by comparing those two translations and substituting other word translation from Mauritian Creole to English, Haitian Creole to English, or French to English words:

1. There is no French to English translation for "marmit". However, the French to English translation for "marmite" is "cooking pot" and the Haitian Creole to English translation for "marmite" is "saucepan".

Therefore, the song title "Ti Marmite" translates from Haitian Creole to English as "Little saucepan".

Note that the word "marmit" is spelled "marmite" for these results. The word "marmit" is spelled "marmite" in some other YouTube videos of this Sega song. I've added links to three of those videos in the comment section below.

**
2. The Haitian Creole translation "What are we going to do for you?" for the second line seems to fit much better than the translation for the line from www.radiomoris.com.

**
3. The Haitian Creole to English results for "Ti éna ene ti marmite" (instead of Ti éna ene ti marmit") is "There was only a small saucepan".

**
4. I believe that the line means "The little black hen did a little dance in it". Here's how I extrapolated that meaning
a) The word "enn" in the line "Enn ti poule noir ti danse ladan" means "it" (I extrapolated this meaning from the Mauritian Creole to English subtitles given in another Abaim YouTube video entitled "Tang mama tang".
b) the word "ti" means "little" in Haitian Creole [see #1]
c) the words "noir poule" mean "black hen" in French.
d) the "danse" means "dance in French and in Haitian Creole
e) The word "laden" means "in it" in Haitian Creole

**
5. The word "pigeons" is clearly a translation of the word "sega". The story about a small black hen dancing in a cooking pot is a witty way of referring to black children dancing the sega.

**
6. The lyrics "Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie connecting pigeons" might mean something like "Aurélie, Aurélie, Aurélie (a girl's name) dance sega with us".

**
7. The French to English translation for the word "roulé" is roll.

**
8. There is no Haitian Creole to English translation for the word "matante". However, the French to English translation for "matante" ("ma tante") and "tante" is "aunt". The Haitian Creole to English translation for "tante" is also "aunt". Therefore, "1 2 3 roulé matante" may mean something like "1 2 3, roll [your hips] like your aunt [does].

**
9. "4 5 6 mathématique" may mean something like "4 5 6 count down!"

**
10. The Haitian Creole to English translation for the word "dan" is "then".

**
11. The Mauritian to English translation for the word "mo" is "I" (from various Mauritian English online pages and from various sub-titled Abaim videos.)

**
12. The Haitian Creole to English translation for the word "panier" is "basket".

Therefore, an English translation for "7 8 9 dan mo panier 9 9 9" may be "7 8 9 then I put it in the basket 9 9 9". "Then I put it in the basket". That line probably refers back to the story of the small black hen dancing in the cooking pot. In this song "Then I put it in the basket" is the signal to dance more energetically, similar to the African American Vernacular English phrase "Break it down (now)", meaning to show your best dance moves.

**
13. Here's my guess about the English translations for the next to the last verse of this song:
Put your hand up
Put your hand in the air
Put your hand up
Put your hand in the air
As the Americans do
As the Americans do.
-snip-
I used most of the https://www.radiomoris.com/translation for this verse.
"Put your hands up in the air" is a widely used Hip Hop chant. People raise their hands up in the air and wave them to the beat of Hip Hop/R&B songs as a way of showing their appreciation for those songs.

I'm guessing the meaning of the word "kas" (cass; kass) from the Google Translate Haitian Creole to English results for the Mauritian Creole line "mo kas enn kann" [I can do it]. That line was given in the subtitles in the YouTube video of the Abaim song "Tang mama tang"

**
14. The Google Translate Haitian Creole to English results for the line "Li apiye ar ros cari" is "She leans to the floor". In the context of this song, that line probably refers to the way some female danced the sega (or danced when they played a circle game with this song.)

**
15. "Alala Manuella ... .Chloé ... .Christina ...." - I think that "Alala Manuella" is a female name. "Chloe" and "Christina" are female names. In this "Ti Marmit" singing game, each of these names represent a girl who is part of the group who the person standing in the middle of the circle points to toward the end of the song. The person who is pointed to at the end of the song =on the name "Christina" is the new middle person.

Additions and corrections for this lyrics are very welcome.

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ADDENDUM TO THIS POST

A. INFORMATION ABOUT SEGA MUSIC AND DANCE
From https://mauritiusattractions.com/mauritius-sega-i-106.html
"Sega in Mauritius
The Sega is a dance which originated from the ritual music of Madagascar and the mainland of Africa, and it is the Musical Expression of the Mauritian Way of Life: Joy and Liveliness.

Originally sung by men and women who had been sold as slaves but whose souls had remained sensitive to music, the Sega is nowadays a folksong which has integrated itself within the framework of our folklore.

The Sega is usually sung in Creole (mother tongue of Mauritians). Many singers had thought of also bringing forward the English version of the Sega songs but later resolved not to proceed with it so as to preserve the uniqueness and cultural richness of the local music of Mauritius.

The original instruments are fast disappearing, making way for the more conventional orchestra ensemble. However, all along the coastal fishing villages, the traditional instruments such as the “Ravanne”, “Triangle”, the “Maravanne” and the traditional guitar are still being used.

Sega Music Instruments
The Ravanne, which is a wooden hoop over which has been stretched a piece of goat skin.

The Coco, (Maracas) which represents the percussion section

The “Triangle”, a triangular piece of metal which tinkles when tapped with an iron rod

The traditional guitar which was a single string instrument with an arc attached to an empty "Calebasse”

The “Maravanne” -wooden rectangular box containing sand or seeds.

Ambiance of Sega
Traditionally stimulated and inspired by local rum, the fishing folks gather around a camp fire. Very often they dance without any music at all and are accompanied only by the sound of the” Ravanne”, the tinkling of spoons, the rattling of seeds/sand in a tin, and the clapping of hands of spectators who eventually join in .

The Sega Dance
The dance itself is the rhythmic swaying of the hips to the pulsating rhythm of the Ravanne. The following description will give you a vivid image of the Sega dance:

The man usually stands in the dancing area with hands on the hips waiting for the girl to shuffle towards him, wiggling, hip-balancing and waving a colorful handkerchief invitingly. Then the partners face each other with a waist-and-shoulder grasp and ... the improvisation starts.

Sega Dance Mauritius
It starts with a gentle swaying, to a slow and solemn tune, which gradually rises and you find the dancers swaying with animated movements to keep pace with the ever-increasing tempo."...

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B. INFORMATION ABOUT ABAIM AND GROUP ABAIM
From https://www.blogger.com/profile/04879472809568439259
"Industry Non-Profit
Location Beau Bassin, Mauritius

Introduction Abaim is a non governmental organisation founded in 1982. It proceeds from the setting-up of a support front during a heroic strike of the Blind Persons at the Lois Lagesse Centre in 1982. Abaim is a registered association. The association is based in Beau-Bassin and operates at the ex-Colonel Maingard Government School. Through its Saturday care project and its movement education and keep fit project, it is now fuly integrated to the local community."
-snip-
My Google search for information about this group resulted in this statement from a website that is no longer available: “Since 1988, the music workshop has set up a musical group, the grup Abaim.”.
-snip-
Here's the link to the non-profit organization Abaim's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groupeabaim/

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C. DESCRIPTION OF THE SINGING GAME THAT IS PERFORMED IN THIS VIDEO*
1. Girls and boys form a big circle with one person in the middle.
2. A person stands in the center of the circle and sings while performing a moderate winding type of dance with her hands on her hips.
3. Members of the group hold hands and walk clockwise around the middle person while singing>
4. When they sing the name "Aurélie", the children drop hands and continue to sing while standing in place.
5. When they sing the counting lyrics beginning with "1 2 3 roulé matante ines", the children sway their hips from side to side on the beat. The middle person also performs this same movement.
6. The group points to the middle person
7. The middle person points to the group.
8. On the lyrics "Met la main la haut", the group and the middle person wave both hands in the air and then place their hands back on their hips, doing a winding dance
9. At the end of the song (on the word "Cristina"), the middle person purposely points to someone in the group, i.e. She doesn't close her eyes or spin while pointing. The person pointed to becomes the new "middle person">
10. The former middle person rejoins the group.
11. The new middle person stands in the middle of the circle and the song immediately begins from the beginning. This pattern continues as long as the group wishes to play this game.
-snip-
*Additions and corrections are welcome.

****
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Visitor comments are welcome.

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Mauritian Creole Song About The Days Of The Week

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Mauritian Creole and information about the non-profit community group, ABAIM. Mauritian Creole is the most widely spoken language in Mauritius, an island nation in Southern Africa.

This post also showcases a video song in Mauritian Creole about the days of the week and includes the des the song's lyrics that are given as subtitles in that video.

I've also included my transcription of the Mauritian Creole words. That transcription is largely based on information that I gleaned from an online page that is included as an Addendum to this post. That page list the etymology of the French word "semens" (English translation: "week"), lists various French Creole words for the English word "week", and also provides the French words for the days of the week.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, linguistic, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in this video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
Thanks to ABAIM for their work with Mauritian children and youth.

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INFORMATION ABOUT MAURITIAN CREOLE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritian_Creole
Mauritian Creole or Morisien (Mauritian Creole: Kreol morisien) is a French-based creole language spoken in Mauritius. In addition to the French base of the language, there are also a number of words from English and from the many African and South Asian languages that have been spoken on the island.

[...]

Sociolinguistic situation
Mauritian creole is the lingua franca of Mauritius. Mauritius, formerly a British colony, has kept English as its only official language, although French is more widely spoken. Mauritians tend to speak Creole at home and French in the workplace. French and English are spoken in schools. Though a large percentage of Mauritians are of Indian descent, they primarily speak Creole, which is their ancestral tongue in the sense that their ancestors along with those of African, European and Chinese descent helped create the creole language together centuries ago, when Mauritius was the meeting place of peoples from different continents who together founded a nation with its own culture and history. Today, around 1 million people speak the language."...

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INFORMATION ABOUT ABAIM
From https://www.blogger.com/profile/04879472809568439259
"Industry Non-Profit
Location Beau Bassin, Mauritius

Introduction Abaim is a non governmental organisation founded in 1982. It proceeds from the setting-up of a support front during a heroic strike of the Blind Persons at the Lois Lagesse Centre in 1982. Abaim is a registered association. The association is based in Beau-Bassin and operates at the ex-Colonel Maingard Government School. Through its Saturday care project and its movement education and keep fit project, it is now fuly integrated to the local community."

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: ABAIM : Zoli Letan Pou Zanfan : Lindi mo al lekol



Thefriendsbe, Published on Nov 25, 2013
-snip-
Music: "Bann Zour Lasemenn" by ABAIM


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LYRICS: LINDO MO AL LEKOL
Lindi mo al lekol
mardi mo al leson
mekredi ena enhancement
zedi mo vinn repetition
Vandredi mo zwe playstation
samdi mo vinn abaim
dimans mo al promne
apre la semen fini

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
and then the weekend comes in

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
and then the weekend comes in
-snip-
These lyrics are given as subtitles in that video.

****
ENGLISH TRANSCRIPTION* - MONDAY I GO TO SCHOOL

(Mauritian children's song by ABAIM)

Monday I go to school
Tuesday I get lessons [homework?]
Wednesday I get enhanced lessons [more difficult lessons; homework]
Thursday I repeat [review?] the lessons/homework I have received]
Friday I'm allowed to play with [my] playstation [video games]
Saturday I go to Abaim
Sunday I go to program [church?]
And then the week is finished

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
and then the weekend comes in

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
and then the weekend comes in
-snip-
*Transcription by Azizi Powell from the video.

I don't know any language except English. Therefore, the part of this transcription that is from Mauritian Creole to English may be incorrect. Additions and corrections are very are welcome.

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ADDENDUM - EXCERPT FROM AN ONLINE PAGE ABOUT THE WORD "WEEK" IN FRENCH AND IN FRENCH CREOLE LANGUAGES
From https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/semaine https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/semaine

"Semaine

Etymology
From Old French semaine, from Late Latin septimāna (“week”), from the Latin septimānus (“related to the seventh element of a series”, adjective), derived from septimus (“seventh”).

[...]

Noun]
semaine f (plural semaines)
week


Descendants

Antillean Creole: simenn
Esperanto: semajno
Guianese Creole: simenn
Haitian Creole: semèn
Karipúna Creole French: simén
Louisiana Creole French: smèn
Mauritian Creole: semen
Seychellois Creole: lasemenn, semenn, smenn
Tayo: semen

See also
(days of the week) jours de la semaine; lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi, vendredi, samedi, dimanche (Category: fr:Days of the week)"

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Monday, November 13, 2017

Videos Of Members Of Historically Black Greek Letter Sororities Singing Their Hymn Or Sweetheart Song

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post documents the way that members of four historically Black Greek lettered sororities singing their sorority hymn or sweetheart song.

These historically Black Greek lettered organizations (given in alphabetically order) are Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc, Delta Sigma Theta, Sorority Inc., Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

The content of this post is presented for cultural purposes.

All coyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are featured in these videos and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

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DISCLAIMER:
These videos don't mean to imply that the body stance that is shown is always the way that members of these sororities always since their hymns or sweetheart songs. Also, in each organization, the body stance for sweetheart songs may be different than the body stance for the organization's national hymn.

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This serves as a companion post to http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/11/videos-of-kkpsi-fratenrity-three.html "Videos Of KKPsi Fratenrity & Three Historically Black Greek Letter Fraternities Crossing Arms While Singing Their Fraternity Hymns".

My sense is that holding hands while singing these songs has the same intent and meaning as the crossed arm body stance that is done by a number of historically Black Greek letter organizations and the integrated honorary band fraternity Kappa Kappa Psi.

I'm interested in identifying additional YouTube video links for arm stances for these featured fraternities and any links to YouTube videos of historically Black Greek letter sororities crossing arms.

Please add any links to these fraternities or sororities singing hymns in the comment section below. Thanks for your help in identifying these videos.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order based on the video's publishing date with the oldest video presented first.

Example #1: Sigma Gamma Rho singing sorority hymn.mpg

Embedding is disabled

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HO-w1dyWvs
freezezone1, Published on Aug 19, 2010

Sorority members sing Sigma Gamma Rho hymn following neo show. April 2010.
-snip-
Description of the body stance while singing their hymn: The sorors (sorority members) stand in a circle and cross arms with the woman on either side.

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Example #2: Delta Sigma Theta (Alpha Chapter) Presents: Tenacious 43 - Neo Show



Hu Reaction, Published on May 16, 2011
-snip-
Description of the body stance while singing their hymn [from .05 to .46] : The sorors stand in a circle and hold their arms in the back of the woman standing on either side, while rhythmically moving to the beat of the song.

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"neo" show = "neophyte" show- a show where new members of the sorority are introduced to the public.

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Example #3: Zeta Phi Beta Hymn @ Scholarship Program



1concordiaselma, Published on Mar 20, 2012

Gamma Eta Zeta Chapter sing the sorority hymn at Scholarship Program
-snip-
Description of the body stance while singing their hymn: The sorors hold the hand of the woman on either side.

Judging by the color suit that he's wearing, the man seated at the table who stood up and gestured for others to stand while the Zetas sung, is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. are the only historically Black Greek letter organizations that have a formal brother/sister relationship.

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Example #4: AKA Wedding Serenade (Soror Scharona Grimsley-Dawkins)



Scharona Grimsley-Dawkins, Published on Sep 9, 2015

Beta Pi, Fall 1996; Kappa Pi Omega Chapter, Mu Sigma Omega, Beta Nu Omega, Lambda Zeta Omega, Mu Alpha, Theta Sigma
-snip-
Description of the body stance while singing their hymn (beginning at 2:28 of this video): The sorors hold the hand of the woman on either side. The soror who is being serenaded (the bride) seats in a chair in the middle of the circle.

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